Paul Potts and missing what God’s grace gives us

I saw these two videos on JT’s site. They’re from the British version of the American show, America’s Got Talent. I don’t really like these programs. They’re exhibitionist. They’re narcissistic. They’re shameful. With that said, this one brought tears to my eyes… and I don’t even like opera! There was just someting about the beautiful voice and seeming emotion put into doing what this man loves that got me all misty.


This is actually the final of the show and I don’t think you’ll be surprised to see who wins:


It did get me to thinking (and trust me, that takes a lot!): I only wish that we wouldn’t “idolize” these kinds of talent. I think it’s wonderful that average, ordinary people with average, ordinary jobs (to sue Simon’s words) have amazing abilities like this. But can we not be thankful unto the Lord for them right where we’re at instead of trying to get them notcied by everyone in the world? Don’t get me wrong, I think Potts’ voice is breathtakingly beautiful. But, if he were a Christian (and I have no knowledge whatsoever of his faith or lack thereof), could he (or the thousands upon thousands who audition for these types of programs) simply be content where God has placed him to shine for Christ where he is? I fully expect to see a Christian-ized version of these programs very soon (if there isn’t already one out there – anybody know?)

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6 Responses

  1. Une étoile est né !

    je l’adore !
    ne le laissez pas filer ….il est tout simplement sublime.

    Montreal, Canada

  2. I have never really watched these shows but those clips were good, thanks

  3. It’s sad that YOU miss the fact that the spirit of God flows THROUGH people who are willing, like Paul Potts, to share their magnificent, yes, spiritual gifts. The response to Mr. Potts was more than a response to his voice, if you’ll come down off your self-righteous pedestal long enough to read some of the thousands of comments. This kind of selflessness and sharing bring other people closer to the God who created the singer and the song. Give your judging of the narcissists and sinners a rest and just sit and listen for a change. You will receive a wonderful blessing.

  4. All are from the one true living God. He raises up, and he sets aside. John spent thirty years in the wilderness. When he did shine, when he prepared the way of the Lord during brief time, he attracted the attention of an entire nation, though dressed in skins. Yes it is right to find contentment in the simple, even in being abased. But there is also to be contentment in abounding. In either, we are to be giving thanks to God. Not for what we see, as mere men try to determine whether or not there is a God, or if He in fact is a Loving Father, but because of what we know. When the world sees a simple man pour his life out as like a drink offering, it touches us. An offering is only made in humility. Wanting to please, more than to receive accolades which serve only to confirm a self-perceived right to acclaim. To see courage reach out to hold fast to confidence even when one is close to the despair from being familiar with sorrow and grief is itself encouraging. The postmodern gospel of self-satisfied simplicity is far from the gospel that calls for hope in the face of great affliction, continual sorrows, fervent prayers, and a love that requires all of ones heart, mind and strength. Perhaps this is what we have been allowed to see a hint of in one of our fellow sojourners.

  5. To Marie-France Boivin, I say, Merci. (hope that’s right; I had to run your comments through an online translator to know what you said) 🙂

    To cuzoogle: I don’t watch them either, but was led to these by a link on another blog.

    To Belva McKann: I’m sorry you took just about everything in my post wrongly. I’m not sure how that happened, but I’ve been doing this a long time and the internet is horrible for the misinterpretations. I would have to disagree with you, however, on the flowing of God’s Spirit through just anyone. If Paul Potts is a true believer, then yes, he has God’s Spirit in him and He would bless Paul’s abilities. If, however, Paul is not a believer, the Spirit may use him on occasion for God’s glory and purpose, but the Bible never speaks of the Spirit flowing through one who is not a believer (unless of course, you appeal to King Saul, and that would not be a good example for appeal).

    Also, sorry if I appeared self-righteous; that was not my intent at all. I was making a general statement about these so-called reality shows: we are indeed an exhibitionistic, voyeuristic, narcissistic society. We love to show off, peer in and have adulation heaped upon us. There are, however, those refreshingly few breaths of air, like a Paul Potts, who humbly just want to sing, not to gain an audience. I hope he’s able to develop his confidence, even if he never gets another applause (that, I know, will not be the case; he’s been discovered)

    And, I wish I could agree with you, that this kind of singing bring us closer to God was accurate. Only for those who are believers; the unbelievers around us will sadly, make this man and his God-given talent an idol, worship the creature rather than the creator and refuse to give any thanks to God for it (disagree with me though you may, but please don’t disagree with Romans 1)

    To Ed Humphreys, I thank you for the gentle tone of your comments. We may, indeed, have been given just a glimpse of what you call “hope in the face of great affliction, etc.” I will say, I was blessed by Paul’s singing. I thought I made that quite clear (it brought many tears, again and again, each time I watched).

  6. His voice is so beautiful, so pure, magnificent….

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